cambridge contemporary art

Printmaking

Gail Brodholt and John Duffin

exhibitions, Painting, Printmaking, ceramicscambridge contemporary artComment

Gail Brodholt and John Duffin

at cambridge contemporary art 

8 - 30 September 2018

We are in for a real treat this September at cambridge contemporary art, with a city-themed exhibition by London-based painter-printmakers Gail Brodholt and John Duffin. Both artists are renowned for their striking depictions of urban environments, each interpreting modern life in the city in their own way. We can't wait to see their work side by side. 

Both artists will be at the gallery for a meet & greet on Saturday 15th September from 2-4pm. Not to be missed!



John Duffin
 is well known for his high contrast black and white etchings focusing on contemporary urban life and metropolitan architecture. His choice of point of view creates an almost cinematic effect. In addition to Duffin's etchings, we will also have a number of his oil paintings on display.


Gail Brodholt creates richly coloured linocuts of modern cityscapes, focusing especially on scenes of urban travel. London's railways, metro trains and tube stations feature prominently with city dwellers on their way across the London transport network.  Gail's expert eye for composition and her distinctive bold lines result in strong graphic images.

Alongside John and Gail's work, we will be showing ceramics

by Maree Allitt and Jane Hollidge.

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Iona Howard in our March Exhibition

exhibitions, Meet the artist, Printmaking, Poetrycambridge contemporary artComment

 

Iona Howard’s prints explore the notion of time and landscape through a contemplative exploration of surface. The sources of Howard’s prints can come from working in the open air or expressing landscape filtered through memory. The physicality of her approach to the printing process makes the subject spontaneous and vibrant whilst capturing an intimate connection with the landscape.

Howard is captivated by the ancient semi-natural landscapes typical of her native west Cornwall where a blurred line exists between nature and human activity. Recent works of the Fens focus on the meeting point of land, horizon and sky, their flatness altering the perception of distance. Howard’s work has gradually evolved from her monochromatic studies by introducing colour to reflect the Fens’ everchanging mood and light. She draws inspiration from sites which have a particular sense of place; the catalyst for her most significant pieces of work.

Howard’s work has more recently been informed by a year-long collaboration with the Fenland Poet Laureate, Kate Caoimhe Arthur. Howard and Arthur have been working and walking together over the last four seasons in the fen-edge landscape that inspires them both. In repeated journeys around Cottenham and Wicken Fen, and more occasional forays into the deeper Fens, they have shared their practices, and each allowed their work to be in conversation with each other’s work.  The process of articulating, to one another, the methods and rhythms of what at some level is instinctive and very private work, has in itself been valuable.  Arthur’s poetry is displayed in the gallery amongst Howard’s prints, with the hope that visitors will see a conversation between the works, rather than a strict correlation between a single print and a single poem.

Please join them both between 6-7pm on Thursday 15th March for a reading of the work alongside the prints and an opportunity to meet both artist and poet with their reflections on the process of making their art.

This free exhibition runs from 3rd - 25th March 2018. We are open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 5.30pm and Sunday from 11am to 5pm.

March Exhibition at cambridge contemporary art

exhibitions, Printmaking, Painting, Woodcambridge contemporary artComment

For our landscape-themed March exhibition at cambridge contemporary art, we are very excited to have new oil paintings by Emma Green, prints by Iona Howard and wooden trugs by Jane Crisp who is new to the gallery.

Emma Green is a contemporary landscape painter based in Woodbridge, Suffolk. Working from her studio by the river Deben, Emma is strongly inspired by the coastal environment around her. Emma’s new collection of work draws on the changing light and atmosphere of the river Deben.

 

Iona Howard’s fine art prints similarly express an intimate connection with landscape, mainly the flat fenland near her Cambridgeshire studio. Howard’s work has more recently been informed by a year-long collaboration with the Fenland Poet Laureate, Kate Caoimhe Arthur. Arthur’s poetry will be displayed alongside Howard’s prints, allowing a conversation to emerge between the two bodies of works both inspired by the fen-edge landscape.

 

Working from her home studio and workshop surrounded by beautiful countryside in Hale Fen, Cambridgeshire, Jane Crisp creates steam-bent trugs. The inspiration for her sculptural vessels comes from the Norfolk reeds and draws on her creative personal connections with local heritage and low-tech processes.

 

Events

We are hosting a poetry and music event on Thursday 15th March from 6-7pm. Kate Caoimhe Arthur who will be doing a poetry reading, accompanied by guitar music by Dominic Howard and sound recordings from the Fens.

Iona Howard will also be at the gallery to give a talk about her printmaking practice on Sunday 18th March at 2pm. This is a free event. This is a great chance to meet the artist and learn more about her printmaking process.

This free exhibition runs from 3rd - 25th March 2018. We are open Monday to Saturday from 9am to 5.30pm and Sunday from 11am to 5pm.

Meet the artist - Vicky Oldfield

Meet the artist, exhibitions, Printmakingcambridge contemporary artComment
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We have started 2018 with a wonderful exhibition of Vicky Oldfield's collagraphs at the front of the gallery.

Her prints are taken from plates which have been collaged with a variety of materials, card, fabric, paper, string, sand and anything else that may come to hand; it's recycling at it's most creative! The plates are then sealed and then inked up and printed in intaglio or relief on damp paper using an etching press. The embossed textural quality of the print is unique to this method.

Thanks to the process itself, she is able to make small editions of the image, the editions are variable due to the process and her desire to experiment, which means each print is unique.

We asked Vicky some questions to find out more about her unique prints.

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How did you get started with your art career?

I went to art college back in the eighties and studied design, I got my first job as a wallpaper designer for crown wallpapers and then worked for a design studio in Paris creating patterns for wallpapers, fabrics and ceramics.  After a return to the UK I freelanced as a designer working on  a variety of design projects from textiles, wallpaper and illustration to creating makes for  craft magazines.  During this time I began printmaking for pleasure, within a few years the printmaking became my main profession.

What inspires you?

I find inspiration everywhere, it's mainly from daily moments, I try to find time to slow down and really look. I start with a drawing and as soon as I am working I find the ideas flow, it's the starting that can sometimes be a problem, if I am stuck, I get in my studio look through my piles of ideas and sketches, try not to think too much and just start and then the ideas flow.

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How do you go about making a new piece?

After starting with drawing and getting lots of ideas and sketches together, the final composition is put together in the same way that I used to design wallpaper, it's all about the textures, pattern, colours and space.

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What are the qualities you enjoy about the medium you work in?

I love printmaking, it's a very versatile medium, so many opportunities for mark making! and when you have the plate made there are a lot of different ways you can print a picture from the same plate,which makes it fun and exciting.  This does mean however that although my work is printed in editions there are huge variations within the editions, in some ways this is lovely as people get a unique piece, in other ways its complicated as my work is not a print in the traditional sense as an identical reproduction.

Which other artists do you admire?

 I have huge admiration for Mary Fedden, Elizabeth Blackadder, Angie Lewin, John Piper, Barbra Rae, Stephen Chambers,  Just to name a few!
 

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Can you describe a typical working day?

 Getting outside is good for the soul, I start the day with an hour long walk in the countryside with my dog, I live just where London hits the green belt, so after a short walk along the railway track I am in the countryside, I think my walks are my main source of inspiration.  I tend to be working in my studio by 9.30, I will work all day if I am printing, with the process I use it's important to print as many as you can in one day as the prints get richer with each pull, but the actual plates start to change and can disintegrate, leaving me with only a portion of the intended edition printed.

If I am not printing, I am either preparing plates, planning artworks,  painting up the pictures , all this mixed with the admin, gallery deliveries and visits to my framer

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How do you see your work evolving in the future? 

Through my artwork, I want to celebrate nature in all it’s beauty, I am planning on my walks to look to see where nature has reclaimed human spaces if only in a small way and to make works related to this. 

Come and visit the gallery to see Vicky's prints on show at cambridge contemporary art, 6 Trinity Street, CB2 1SU from 2nd - 14th January 2018. The gallery is free to enter.

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Photos of the gallery by Zuza Grubecka

 

In the Forest – Paul Smith & Flora McLachlan - 7th-29th October

exhibitions, Demonstrations, Meet the artist, Etching, Sculpture, Printmakingcambridge contemporary artComment

 

Our autumn show at cambridge contemporary art is a forest-themed exhibition with etchings by Flora McLachlan and sculptures by Paul Smith. Their work shares a magical, dream-like quality and both artists are inspired by fables and fairytales.

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Paul Smith makes hand-built figurative ceramic sculptures and limited edition sculptures in bronze, iron and marble resin. His work explores the relationship between mankind and the natural world, with a special interest in encounters between humans and animals. Rather than realistic depictions, he is interested in rendering dream-like images, designed to create a feeling of peaceful co-existence between us and nature. Paul is inspired by fairytales and children’s stories, often playfully subverting or reinterpreting them.

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Equally enthralled by the natural world, Flora McLachlan creates beautiful etchings and paintings of enchanted landscapes roamed by mythical creatures, infused with a sense of mystery. She tries to express a sense of lost or hidden magic, a glimpse through trees of the white hart. Etching is the ideal medium for her purpose, with its high contrast deep blacks and glowing whites creating an ethereal atmosphere. Her work is inspired by medieval English literature, myths and legends. We will have a mix of etchings, drawings, paintings and monotypes, including brand new work.

 

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The exhibition opens on 7th October and runs until 29th October. Both artists are coming to the gallery to hold demonstrations, make sure not to miss these unique opportunities to meet them and see how they create their work. On Saturday 7th October at 11 am Paul Smith will be building his howling wolf sculpture live in the gallery. On Saturday 28th October at 11am, Flora McLachlan will be holding a printmaking demonstration on her miniature mangle press. We hope to see you there! Admission is free but due to limited space in the gallery we kindly ask to register for the Paul Smith event here.

Meet the Artist - Richard Spare

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Richard Spare's wonderful prints are now on show at Cambridge Contemporary Art in an exhibition with printmaker Robert Greenhalf that runs until 5th March. His pared down images, depicting scenes of wildlife, coastal scenes and still life, are inspired by his studio garden, and time spent travelling in America and Japan.

To learn more about the way Richard works we asked him a few questions.

When did you first know you wanted to be an artist? 
I don’t remember as a child making a sudden decision to be an artist, but from an early age I was drawn to making and designing.  It was a natural progression to go to art college and work with other artists. 

What inspires you? 
Nature must be an inspiration to everyone!  The garden at my studio is a constant source of inspiration, as is travel - on arrival in a new part of the world, I am usually weighed down with copper plates! 

What are the qualities you enjoy about the medium you work in? 
I always draw directly onto the plate from my chosen subject.  I love working straight onto the copper, the act of drawing on the resistant copper dictates the way I draw, and the way the image turns out.  I am not transposing from another medium, so each print is an original interpretation, individually printed by hand, and hand painted.  Each print is thus slightly different. I enjoy the rich velvet blacks of the drypoint line against the pure pigment of the watercolour and find the vibrancy of the pigment against the strength of the black a beautiful combination. 
 
How long does the process take and what is involved? 
Each single print takes considerable time to produce.  Aside from the time taken drawing the image (which takes many hours and some strength!) - the plate must be re-inked and hand-wiped for each print made.  The plates are printed on my antique etching presses - the technique having changed very little since Rembrandt’s day. 
The press is turned by hand and the damp paper is peeled off the plate to reveal an image which is thus unique - no mass production here!  The print is then dried for eight hours under weights and is hand-coloured, the application of watercolour painting on the printed drypoint line and gives another dimension of uniqueness. Use of precise colour is extremely important; my wife Kay and I spend a lot of time proofing the colours, until the right balance is achieved. 
 
Do your floral titles come from a knowledge of plants/botany/horticulture
Unfortunately I don’t have green fingers myself, or know many Latin names, but I adore flowers and get a real buzz when something wonderful blooms in the studio garden! 
 
How do you arrive at your pared-down images? 
By a process of elimination, over the years I’ve tried to express the essence of what I see. I attempt to evoke the fragility of life and my respect for its existence. Each animal, bird or flower has its own character, often engagingly quirky or even humorous, I enjoy bringing these charictoristics out in my work. 

How did your time in America and Japan influence you? 
Whilst in New York I spent a great amount of time in the museums.  It was during one such visit to MOMA that I was struck by Matisse’s sublime simplicity of line and shape.  On return to London I went on to produce Blue Bird, which was, I suppose, the start of my current work. 
Since then I have traveled extensively in Japan which I was fortunate enough to visit annually for eleven years for a series of solo shows. After a five year break, I am excited to be going back this November for 25 shows right across Japan. I adore the rich culture and artistic traditions, the beauty of the landscape, and the people, all of which has an influence on my work.  
 
Which other artists do you admire? 
Rembrandt, Goya, Van Gogh, Picasso, David Hockney, Hokusai, Utamaro, Hiroshige and many, many more. 
 
What are your favourite museums and galleries? 
 MOMA, NY,  Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam,  Royal Academy, London, Ukiyo-E Ota Memorial Museum of Art, Tokyo. 
 
Can you describe a typical working day
I am not a morning person! I usually work at home in the morning, going through the diary, signing prints or discussing ideas or licensing requests with Kay. I arrive at my studio, which is a few miles away, in the late morning and open up the shutters at the back so I can see the garden while I work. I may be printing, or steelfacing my plates (an electroplating process which strengthens the drawn plate, so the image is maintained throughout the punishing pressures on the copper as the edition is printed on the antique etching presses). If I am travelling then of course I am out drawing! 
 
How do you see your work evolving in the future? 
My work will always be informed by travel and nature and I seek inspiration in these. My interpretations have evolved gradually over the years and I’m sure will continue to do so. The printmaking process is constantly surprising and inspiring in itself, and I like to use found textures and marks in some of my works. 
 
What are your general interests? 
My work and leisure cannot really be separated, - but my family, travel, film, meeting up with old friends come top of the list. 

Meet Richard Spare in the gallery on 19th February at 2pm. Richard will be at cambridge contemporary art (6 Trinity Street, Cambridge) to chat to visitors about his work.


 

 

October Exhibition with Niki Bowers, Carry Akroyd and Simon Griffiths

exhibitions, Printmaking, Sculpture, Meet the artistcambridge contemporary artComment

 

Niki Bowers, Carry Akroyd and Simon Griffiths Exhibition

1st – 23rd October

Niki Bowers

Landmark

linocut

Simon Griffiths

Hare (close-up)

ceramic

Carry Akroyd

Hugin & Munin

serigraph

 

Be sure not to miss our Autumn exhibition this year, with beautiful nature-inspired work by printmakers Niki Bowers and Carry Akroyd and sculptor Simon Griffiths.

 

Based in Norfolk, Niki Bowers creates linocut prints inspired by the rural landscape and wildlife surrounding her. Niki makes her prints entirely by hand using linseed oil based inks. If you’ve visited our gallery before, you might have seen one of her popular starling prints gracing our walls.

Painter and printmaker Carry Akroyd has lived most of her life in rural East Northamptonshire. Nature is her favourite subject and her brightly coloured prints depict a wide range of fauna and flora. Carry enjoys experimenting with different media.

Simon Griffiths grew up in rural Durham and this is where he draws his inspiration as well as his great respect for the natural world. He spends a lot of time studying the North Pennine wildlife and countryside before they find their way into his hand built stoneware sculptures.

 

Simon Griffiths

Tawny Owl

ceramic on wood

Niki Bowers

High Summer

linocut

 

Carry Akroyd

Big Turns and Little Terns

serigraph

 

The exhibition runs from 1st until 23rd October. Come to the gallery on Saturday 1st October to celebrate the opening of our new exhibition and meet Carry Akroyd and Niki Bowers from 2 to 4 pm.

Carry Akroyd will be in the gallery again to meet visitors on 15th October from 2 to 4 pm and Niki Bowers will be back on 22nd October from 2 to 4 pm. Come along to the gallery and have a chat with these two wonderful print artists!

Carry Akroyd in her studio

Niki Bowers - Winter Starlings - linocut

Meet the artist - Mychael Barratt

Printmaking, Etching, Meet the artist, exhibitions, Paintingcambridge contemporary artComment

For our new exhibition at cambridge contemporary art, Mychael Barratt has filled the walls with his original prints and paintings,  showing an eclectic mix of themes representing all of his major artistic passions. His work is on show from 3rd -23rd September alongside ceramics by Vicky Lindo, Jane Hollidge and Gwen Vaughan. 

To learn more about the way Mychael works we have asked him a few questions.

How did you get started with your art career?
About 25 years ago, I was walking by the Thames when I popped in to the Royal Festival Hall to get out of the rain. There was a printmaking exhibition on in the foyer and I was so impressed that I started an etching course at Central St Martins the following week. I had been working as a painter before but that was when I started printmaking. 

How do you go about making a new piece?
For big pieces the idea is always the starting point. Once I have the inspiration I start on doing the research and usually don't do any drawing until I've virtually planned the whole thing out in my head. The paintings are much more spontaneous. 

What is your preferred medium/colour pallet to use?
I love both painting and printmaking. As I make them in two separate studios and approach them so differently I couldn't say which is a favourite medium. In printmaking, my heart is definitely in etching.

What inspired the range of work that we have in the gallery?
The work in the gallery was inspired by various things. The 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare has had a huge impact on my work, inspiring at least three pieces. A recent visit walking around Cambridge has obviously inspired a couple of the paintings.

Exit, Pursued by a Bear

A Map of Shakespeare's London

 

We are currently showing your dog works, how do you go about selecting the artist that you paying homage to?
The artists are all ones whose work I admire but the most crucial thing is that little eureka moment when I get an idea that makes me laugh. They are sincere homages made with a huge level of care but are also hopefully quite funny. 

Is it challenging emulating all the different styles of your dog works? What is the style that you are most pleased to have achieved?
Emulating the style of the different artists is always a challenge because it forces me to work in unfamiliar manners. The one I am most pleased with is probably the Turner. I am constantly learning by doing these and painting the Hockney's dogs was definitely the most fun and has probably had the biggest impact on how I paint. 

Turner's Dog

Hockney's Dogs

Which other artists do you admire?
I admire so many artists and have a large art library. In printmaking, Rembrandt, Goya, Hogarth, Chris Orr and Grayson Perry. In painting my heart is definitely with Chagall although I think the way I work is more like Hopper. The list would be endless. 

Could you describe a typical working day?
I divide a typical day up between research and practical work and a perfect day would see me doing some printmaking and some painting. I'm happiest when I have a huge stretch of drawing ahead of me.

How do you see your work evolving in the future?
In the future I plan to do at least a couple more huge maps and carry on with the other strands and themes of my work like the artist's dogs and cats. Really I want to just keep getting better! 

Meet Mychael Barratt in the gallery on Saturday 24 September, 1-3pm. Mychael will be at cambridge contemporary art (6 Trinity Street, Cambridge) showing visitors how he produces his work.

September exhibition at CCA

Printmaking, Painting, ceramics, exhibitionscambridge contemporary artComment

You and your friends are warmly invited to the exhibition preview on Saturday 3rd September from 11 am. You can meet Mychael Barratt at the gallery on Saturday 3rd September, 11-1pm and Saturday 24th September, 1-3pm.

 exhibition runs 3rd -23rd September 2016

Painter and printmaker Mychael Barratt creates works that are full of detail, humour and a great sense of storytelling. He draws inspiration from sources as diverse as fairy tales, historical figures and Shakespearean dramas to classic paintings and pop culture. Mychael has created a range of work that features famous artists and their pets, skillfully re-imagined in the original artist’s style, resulting in a humorous sense of déjá vu.

Mychael Barratt

Edward Hopper's Dog

etching

Mychael Barratt

Stray Cats and Lost Sonnets

etching

Mychael Barratt

Magritte's Dogs

oil on panel

Vicky Lindo Ceramics is the creative partnership of Vicky Lindo and William Brookes. Producing earthenware slip cast ceramics, they use coloured underglazes and slips to illustrate and decorate their tableware and animal figures. We are delighted to welcome them to our gallery.

Jane Hollidge's pots are all made by hand, using coiling and pinching methods. Some are then burnished for smoke firing.  Jane likes to keep the shapes simple and decorates her post with abstract designs in vibrant colours using velvet glazes.

Gwen Vaughan creates figurative sculptural pieces using the traditional technique of pinching. Gwen works with a rich black clay, and carves into the surface to create a texture inspired by the qualities of slate and stone. She uses washes of coloured slip to enhance textural detail.

Vicky Lindo

Bear Pot Black and Gold

ceramic

Gwen Vaughan

Whale

ceramic

Jane Hollidge

Bowl

ceramic

Brenda Hartill, Illona Morrice and Lara Scobie Exhibition

Printmaking, Painting, ceramics, Sculpture, exhibitionscambridge contemporary artComment

cambridge contemporary art is delighted to launch a new exhibition with prints and paintings by Brenda Hartill, sculptures by Illona Morrice and ceramics by Lara Scobie. The exhibition runs from 28th May until 19th June. You and your friends are warmly invited to the exhibition preview on Friday 27th May from 6pm to 7pm.

Brenda Hartill is an innovative British painter and printmaker based in East Sussex. Her work explores the texture, pattern and light of landscape in richly coloured and textured images, often enhanced with silver and gold leaf. Brenda's strong fascination with the primeval, essential structure of the earth and its elements has heavily influenced her prints. While her primary aim is to develop abstract images in the studio, Brenda’s work is firmly rooted in the landscape, and she often finds it necessary to return to it. Whilst known especially for her print-making skills, Brenda has in recent years focussed her attention on a series of watercolours on handmade paper, embossed using her print-making techniques and presses.

 

Brenda Hartill

Cool Sun I

embossed watercolour

Brenda Hartill

Rainbow Storm VI

embossed watercolour

 

Like Brenda Hartill, sculptor Illona Morrice takes her inspiration from the landscape that surrounds her. Living by the sea on the Moray coast in Scotland, Illona uses the rock, stones and wildlife on the beach and in the mountains as a source of creativity. Over the years, Illona has realised she can say more with less, so her sculptures have become more simplified. Her stoneware clay sculptures are individually made by hand, and no two are ever the same. Illona also creates sculptures which are cast in bronze. Each piece is different, and only a small edition is made.

 

Illona Morrice

Penguins

glazed stoneware

Illona Morrice

Terns

glazed stoneware on soapstone

 

Lara Scobie is a ceramicist based in Edinburgh whose work is predominantly concerned with the dynamic interplay between form and pattern. This is explored through the cohesive integration of drawing, surface mark making and volume. Lara is interested in the space that surrounds pattern as much as the hue and texture of the decorated surface. Surface patterns and colour observed in botanical life enable Lara to explore her love of colour and abstract pattern making.

 

Lara Scobie

Bowls

ceramic

Lara Scobie

Set of Pourers

ceramic

 

Brenda Hartill will be giving a talk about her collagraph printing methods, as well as her unique painting and collage techniques on Saturday 18 June at 3pm. Book a free place by email info@cambridgegallery.co.uk, in person at the gallery or over the phone on 01223 324222.

Glynn Thomas Retro-perspective

exhibitions, Demonstrations, Printmaking, Etchingcambridge contemporary artComment

This April, cambridge contemporary art is showing a retrospective of Glynn Thomas’s work in honour of the artist’s 70th birthday.

Glynn Thomas was born in Cambridge in April 1946 and studied illustration and printmaking at the Cambridge School of Art in the 1960s. Glynn then moved to Suffolk, where he is still based today. cambridge contemporary art is delighted to be celebrating Glynn’s career, which spans over five decades. Glynn has been showing at the gallery for over 20 years and is one of the gallery’s best-loved artists. This exhibition will be Glynn’s largest show to date, with hot-off-the-press new etchings, an extensive collection of work created over the last 50 years, and some of his early student work.

 

Cambridge Boat Houses

 

Glynn Thomas specialises in creating limited edition prints from copper-plate etchings which are hand-drawn and painted onto the plate. The entire process, from the direct line drawings in his sketchbook to figuring out the composition and finally etching the plate, is extremely time-consuming. From its conception to the resulting print, one of Glynn's largest etchings can take more than 200 hours of work to create. Each print is individually inked and entirely unique.

St Edwards Passage

 

Glynn Thomas has a very particular take on perspective, hence the title of this exhibition. He often incorporates several points of view to create a more complete overview of a place. In the extremely insightful book "Glynn Thomas: East Anglia, A Different Perspective" by Alan Marshall, Glynn Thomas is quoted as saying:

"I take the view that you are walking through a landscape. You start off with what is in front of you - then I draw what is beyond that and possibly what is behind me. I have a habit of layering things one on top of the other."

He adds that he moved away from traditional approaches to perspective because "Everybody draws things in rectangles, but if you close one eye you see your nose and the elliptical shape of the eye, so I was always intrigued by how each eye sees different things."

Alan Marshall's book is a highly recommended read if you are interested in learning more about Glynn Thomas's work. It is available at the gallery and is £27.50.

The exhibition runs from Saturday April 2nd until Sunday April 24th. You and your friends are warmly invited to meet Glynn at the exhibition preview on April 2nd from 11am until 2pm.

Glynn will also be holding printing demonstrations at the gallery on April 24th from 12 until 4 pm. Do not miss this unique chance to learn how Glynn creates his beautiful etchings. If you would like to attend the demonstrations, please book a free place in person at the gallery, by e-mailing info@cambridgegallery.co.uk or by phoning 01223 324222.

 

The Champion of the Thames

Early Doors